Where did the main political forces win and loose votes

In 2017 were the legislative elections in Argentina. Not only the new representatives of the Congress are elected, it is an opportunity for the political forces to measure their power in each province.

The map shows the 2017 Elections results for each political force, and the user can compare them with the primary elections and with the 2015 presidential elections of 2015.

This tool not only displays the votes results in absolute values, also the percentage of votes that each political force won or lost. The user can click on each province and see the result for each location in in a pop-up

The innovative thing is the design, the way of presenting the information. We chose to represent the provinces of our country through squares, and give each one a simple graph of arrows that reflect that percentage of votes each politcal force won or lost.

 

How we did it?

We looked for the official data results of: the presidential elections of 2015, the primary elections 2017 and the general elections 2017.

With all the information, we categorized the political forces according to three major groups: the party Cambiemos, the party that responds to the Kirchnerismo and the peronismo no kirchnersita.

The political groups that do not identify with these three forces were not taken into account.

We used: d3js, underscore.js, jquery, css3, sass, node, gulp.

Sin comentarios

Legislative Elections 2017: map with live results province by province

A unique and valuable service for the the users to know the legislative election results of each district and province in real time.

In addition to the map with the percentage of votes for each province, the tool offers:

- The option to see the results not only by province, but also by the districts that comonen each of them.

- The name, photograph and political orientation of each of the 4.216 senator and deputies candidates,

- The results they obtained with the absolute value and the percentage of votes.

- The number of votes counted at a given time

- A switcher which allows the user to compare the actual results with the primary ones and a color palette for each political orientation with gradual transparency that allows the user to see the distribution of votes between them.

-  Another switcher to know the results by deputies or senators.

The update of the results in real time was automated and the users could see the date and time of the last modification.

 Live link  

 

Impact

The map was replicated in several news outlets, even our main media group competitor published the app on their TV programs.

The election coverage was trending topic on Twitter, and many of the politicians of the different districts shared the web app on their social media.

It even obtained 1.170.000 pageviews and 40% of the traffic came from Google.

 

How we did it? 

We divided the process in multiple steps.

Firstly, we downloaded and validated the election data given by the government.

Then, we saved it into a database to later process it and created different JSON’s depending on app needs.

We tried to write small process so it is easier to parallelize the work and the runtime process.

In addition, to show the seats that each candidate won, we calculated and programmed the formula taking into account the D’Hont system for the deputies chamber and in the case of the senators it was easy because it is one representing the majority and the other representing the minority.

We used Python and PostgresSQL as the database for processing and saving the official data provided by the government. Also, Javascript and D3.js for rendering the map, and the Amazon services for hosting the backend and frontend.

Sin comentarios

Ranking of absence in Congress: which are the political party factions with more absences

>>> LIVE LINK <<<

Description 

As part of the Legislative Elections in 2017, an analysis of absences was made among representatives from the last renewal of seats in December 2015 to September last year. The number of absences in the Lower House at the moment of voting was analyzed and it was further detailed according to each political party and the Province that elected them. Finally, it was made a list with the names of the representatives with more absences and those representatives who were never absent.

Many of the members wanted to be reelected so the purpose of this article was to show the percentage of representatives who are present to cast their vote.

 

What makes this project innovative?  Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

Unveiling Argentina´s elections system failures with impact.

Producing evidence data through Open data journalism and civic collaboration .

 

Elections transparency impact after comparing digitized primary elections telegrams with manually completed forms using technology and citizen participation in Argentina

In 2015, presidential elections were held in Argentina with massive protests and complaints in some provinces as regards of fraud during primary elections. National and some provinces electoral systems were under suspicious.

We decided to take action in order to analyze relevant public documents, looking to send a message to Government that we, the people,  were monitoring to avoid irregularities or fraud during final election and that this could be done using technology for accountability.

A government site has published more than 95.000 telegrams that authorities from each polling station sent to the postal office containing the amount of votes that each party and each candidate won, how many election monitors were present, etc. It’s not the complete overview concerning documents of the electoral process, but it is the first and original source, a handwritten form, from which all electoral results are processed.

We scraped the electoral results official site and built a dataset with the digitized data of every voting poll so we could built the complete dataset from scratch that would help us double check, use data analysis to detect the outliers from districts we should focus on and prioritize our citizen control efforts.  Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

Users taking control: Argentina´s 2015 Elections interactive cross platforms data visualizations

During 2015, Argentina had national and local elections including executive and legislative branches. It was a record for us citizens to vote in 6 opportunities the same year, for example in the City of Buenos Aires. In the national level, we had three elections: the Primaries, the General and the Ballotage elections in which president Macri won.

In terms of data: more than 32.000.000 possible voters distributed in 95.000 polling stations from 14.000 schools in all the territory of  Argentina, multiplied by 3 national elections.

Knowing that 2015 was going to be a strong election’s year in Argentina at La Nación we started early planning a strategy to tackle a long known problem that kept us from being able to show our readers the election results at a very fine-grained level. The geolocation of all the polling stations in Argentina.

Don’t miss: How we geolocated > 13.000 polling stations? Hint: A little help from Machine Learning, Knight Mozilla OpenNews fellows and  6 members of the team working heavily on validation process for almost 6 months. Take a look at the tools. 

Thanks to this effort we had our exclusive geolocalized polling votation national map.

For this unique opportunity we could focus in designing creative pieces that will serve  print, web and mobile from scratch reusing the same graphics pieces as well as considering real time data as the first input source. We developed an interactive map comparing the three elections on the national level, another comparing two elections from the City of Buenos Aires and the real time Congress/Senate visualization that was built on the fly as vote results were reported from the National Elections Office. 

What makes your project innovative? 

The opportunity to use technology to transfer control to the users and let them see, analyze and compare in detail. In this case our interactive data visualization served also for citizen control as we could reach and show the detail of every polling station including the original form manually completed and signed by the desk authorities.

The mix of real time data that was positioned in Lanacion.com home page the same afternoon as results were partially released by the National Electoral Office and a strategy to design only one piece using SVGs to reuse the same that night for the print edition were another innovations.

Using the drawing plugin for Leaflet, Leaflet.draw we could let the reader draw over the map, and with that drawing, through a geospatial query, the user can get the results from each intersecting polling station, aggregate them, and display the selected results.

Crossing two and three datasets in the more atomized level also was new as we could compare by irregular polygons in a map or by structured districts, the evolution of voters in the same polling station.  This is just the beginning of what can be done in the future if we are proactive to prevent fraud and let people control in real time at such a detailed level.

I. How was the election in YOUR voting booth?

Click the image above to enlarge features translations. Or click here for the map live.

Result for the runoff presidential election. The graphic shows the minimum possible detail for the election result. Every single poll station, as well as every telegram with the result of every voting booth are detailed. The main goal  is to personalize the results and engage people to find their own voting booth result.

Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

Argentina 2015 presidential elections Geolocating polling stations

Introduction

Knowing that 2015 was going to be a strong election’s year in Argentina at La Nación we started early planning a strategy to tackle a long known problem that kept us from being able to show our readers the election results at a very fine-grained level. The geolocation of all the polling stations in Argentina.

From previous experiences in 2013 we knew that putting in an enormous effort we were able to geolocate the polling stations of Buenos Aires City and province (approximately 5300 polling stations)

The overall number we were facing for Argentina was over 13000 polling stations and we could not tell in advance if they were going to be the same from 2013.

So we decided that we wanted to try a new approach to reduce the problem using some machine learning technique. We knew from the start that the validation part of the process will still be tedious and gigantic but reusing and customizing some of the tools developed for the manual approach for 2013 we thought is was doable and worth giving a try.

 

Sources

To be able to do a jump start we started working on 2013 data. We did not want to wait until June/July for the government to release the final list of polling stations for the 2015 presidential elections.

On one hand we had the inventory of the 13,000 polling stations given by the government for 2013 with an “address” but no coordinates to render on a map.

On the other hand we had another inventory of schools for Argentina, made for totally different purpose by the Ministry of Education but luckily it included their corresponding geolocation. Back in 2013 we saw that many polling stations were located on schools throughout Argentina we decided to try to match them using a Machine Learning technique.  Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

Argentina: Elections 2015

During 2015, Argentina had national and local elections including executive and legislative branches. It was a record for us citizens to vote in 6 opportunities the same year, for example in the City of Buenos Aires. In the national level, we had three elections: the Primaries, the General and the Ballotage elections in which president Macri won.

In terms of data: more than 32.000.000 possible voters distributed in 95.000 polling stations from 14.000 schools in all the territory of  Argentina, multiplied by 3 national elections.

Knowing that 2015 was going to be a strong election’s year in Argentina at La Nación we started early planning a strategy to tackle a long known problem that kept us from being able to show our readers the election results at a very fine-grained level. The geolocation of all the polling stations in Argentina.

Don’t miss: How we geolocated > 13.000 polling stations? Hint: A little help from Machine Learning, Knight Mozilla OpenNews fellows and  6 members of the team working heavily on validation process for almost 6 months. Take a look at the tools. 

Thanks to this effort we had our exclusive geolocalized polling votation national map.

For this unique opportunity we could focus in designing creative pieces that will serve  print, web and mobile from scratch reusing the same graphics pieces as well as considering real time data as the first input source.

What makes your project innovative? 

The opportunity to use technology to transfer control to the users and let them see, analyze and compare in detail. In this case our interactive data visualization served also for citizen control as we could reach and show the detail of every polling station including the original form manually completed and signed by the desk authorities.

The mix of real time data that was positioned in Lanacion.com home page the same afternoon as results were partially released by the National Electoral Office and a strategy to design only one piece using SVGs to reuse the same that night for the print edition were another innovations.

Using the drawing plugin for Leaflet, Leaflet.draw we could let the reader draw over the map, and with that drawing, through a geospatial query, the user can get the results from each intersecting polling station, aggregate them, and display the selected results.

Crossing two and three datasets in the more atomized level also was new as we could compare by irregular polygons in a map or by structured districts, the evolution of voters in the same polling station.  This is just the beginning of what can be done in the future if we are proactive to prevent fraud and let people control in real time at such a detailed level.

I. How was the election in YOUR voting booth?

Result for the runoff presidential election. The graphic shows the minimum possible detail for the election result. Every single poll station, as well as every telegram with the result of every voting booth are detailed. The main goal  is to personalize the results and engage people to find their own voting booth result.

Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

Vozdata 2015: Unveiling Argentina´s elections system failures with impact.

Producing evidence data through Open data journalism and civic collaboration .

 

I. Elections transparency impact after comparing digitized primary elections telegrams with manually completed forms using technology and citizen participation in Argentina. Our third Vozdata Project.

In 2015, presidential elections were held in Argentina with massive protests and complaints in some provinces as regards of fraud during primary elections. National and some provinces electoral systems were under suspicious.

We decided to take action in order to analyze relevant public documents, looking to send a message to Government that we, the people,  were monitoring to avoid irregularities or fraud during final election and that this could be done using technology for accountability.

A government site has published more than 95.000 telegrams that authorities from each polling station sent to the postal office containing the amount of votes that each party and each candidate won, how many election monitors were present, etc. It’s not the complete overview concerning documents of the electoral process, but it is the first and original source, a handwritten form, from which all electoral results are processed.

We scraped the electoral results official site and built a dataset with the digitized data of every voting poll so we could built the complete dataset from scratch that would help us double check, use data analysis to detect the outliers from districts we should focus on and prioritize our citizen control efforts.  Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios

How community and open source code drive LNData

The web, or more than that, digital media consumed from any platform, is the richest place to express any form of communication, to enrich any content or message and reach a large audience. Journalism has the greatest opportunity ever to access to all these formats and platforms, to produce and reuse the best quality content and at the same to become the best service for a committed society who already has the tools and the talent to collaborate and create meaningful change.

So when we speak about “open data journalism” and we think about the open data world, it is a chance for journalism to be open to new challenges, open for change and open to share and make teams with developers, NGO´s, universities and others and co produce better content together. We have the power to add value, transforming from documents from raw to open data, but publishing raw material as evidence as well. Easy and free!

Documentcloud is great for that and easy for everyone to use.

When it comes tocollaboration, a couple of experiences in our case were: Vozdata, our Open Collaboration Platform to transform PDF into datasets that was inspired by the  Free The files project from Propublica and The Guardian´s MP´s Expenses case.

It was developed from scratch by our OpenNews fellow Manuel Aristaran, and Gabriela Rodriguez to fulfill a need we have in many countries that lack a FOI law and open data: documents published in PDFs, sometimes unstructured and scanned as images, and on the other hand, a community of people that wants to help and is ready to prove it.

So, together with more than 1100 volunteers from universities and NGOs we processed and transformed more than 10.000 PDF with Senate Expenses, and articles from these datasets produced front page stories and even judicial investigations of public servants.

Again, journalism helps raise these datasets “voices” , that would be kept in silence and trapped in those PDFs. Vozdata is open sourced as “Crowdata” and is being reused by other countries and projects.

Open Statements of Assets:   a collaboration project that produced open data from manually typed print copies of 1200 Statements of Assets (Affidavits) that were requested of the three powers: Executive, Legislative and Judicial. We worked in collaboration with three transparency NGOs that monitor these powers and more than 30 volunteers who typed and checked in our “checkathons” (full days checking and having fun!) thanks to collaborative tools and coordinated work. We are now open sourcing this platform and adding more content and features to it.

Election granular data presented in interactive maps can help citizens monitor in detail. Another project we are working and amplifying this year is Elections. With Juan Elosua, taking the original map from Manuel Aristaran.

We can see in every school that there is the detail of every vote.

And after that he built a tool that allows us to compare and make more in depth analysis by “zone” drawing polygons that selects points and adding the results inside these new polygons.

So here technology is helping citizens and journalism analyze and understand in a time lapse and in detail the changes regarding limits, a great tool we can build once and reuse many times is a tool worth investing in. Journalists that are open to experience new tools and technology don’t need to understand everything, they need to trust.

To learn where innovation is, there is an opportunity to assist and engage with movements like Hacks/Hackers or Open Knowledge, where as an example, in a hackathon we met Andy Tow who specializes in elections data and gathered with a team, together with Gaba our Fellow, we applied for a challenge and won a little fund to build an app that presents a searchable database, maps and analyzes campaign financing data since 2007.

When technologists embrace activism to apply their skills for change, they become the best: hacktivists! Those are the ones that gather the power or apply technology and the proactivity to surprise journalism with incredible discoveries in large volumes of data, platforms of entity extraction, machine learning, interactive visualizations that cross all platforms and intelligent ways of solving problems.

We loved to feel the magic of talented fellows who really helped us leapfrog, make big steps, take risks and learn, but also together with our journalism and open collaboration platforms prove that the power of working together accelerates changes, is efficient and multiplies its effect when open sourced and shares with others.

Regarding the Knight-Mozilla Opennews fellowship, If you have the opportunity to apply to be a Fellow, do it! you will learn, experience and help with what you already know.

The search ends August 21, 2015 and the application form >> is here. <<

 

Sin comentarios

The Political Maze 2015

The candidates for president in Argentina are already immersed in the complex electoral race with focus on arriving to the Casa Rosada by the end of 2015. A good exercise for voters is to explore as a wayback machine and review the political past of each candidate, and get more background beyond their promises or public statements.

LA NACION launched by the end of 2014 The Political Maze 2015”, an interactive tool for visualizing the political path made by the major candidates and crosses between them in different political parties during previous elections.  Seguir leyendo

Sin comentarios